Objections to Class Settlements

The Seventh Circuit Clears a Roadblock to Settlement

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As I have discussed in earlier posts, there are multiple stakeholders to class action settlements, including named plaintiffs, absent class members, class counsel, defendants, and the courts. Conflicts can arise within some of these groups, and perhaps most often arise among the class members themselves. A settlement that looks good to one named plaintiff or their counsel, for example, might not look good to another member of the class or their counsel. The ability of dissenting class members to object to a proposed settlement is one safeguard that can assist a court in determining whether a class action settlement satisfies Rule 23(e)(2)’s “fair, reasonable, and adequate” standard.

When an objection is brought in good faith and has merit, it can result in a better deal for the class. Unfortunately, not all objections are made in good faith. Rather, some are made with the sole objective of enriching the objector and the objector’s counsel, with no accompanying benefit to the settlement class. And often parties and their